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Your Home Doesn’t Come with a Lifeguard

Your Home Doesn’t Come with a Lifeguard Staying safe around water is more than staying near the lifeguard at the pool. Every year many children drown in residential ...

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Text of Your Home Doesn’t Come with a Lifeguard

Your Home Doesn t Come with a Lifeguard Staying safe around water is more than staying near the lifeguard at the pool. Every year many children drown in residential swimming pools, bath tubs, buckets of water and other containers of water. Anywhere there is water there is risk for drowning. Do not leave a young child unattended near any source of water, not even for a moment. For more information or to enroll in Swimming and Water Safety courses, contact your local Red Cross chapter. Remove the risk and prevent access. Use physical barriers to prevent children from accessing any source of water. Use safety locks on toilets and keep bathroom doors closed and toilet-bowl covers down if there are small children in the home. Empty cleaning buckets immediately after use. Empty kiddie pools immediately after use. Install barriers around your home pool. Pool alarms and covers provide additional layers of protection. Know the water hazards in your community and make sure children stay away. These hazards could include - Drainage ditches. - Garden ponds. - Creeks and streams. - Wells and cisterns. - Canals. When visiting another home, check the site for potential water hazards and always supervise children. Practice water safety. Teach children to always ask permission to go near water. Never leave a young child unattended in a bath tub and do not trust a child s life to another child or to aids that help a child sit upright in the tub. Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket around water. When swimming, set specific rules for each individual based on swimming ability. Designate a person to watch over children whenever they are in, on or around any body of water. Know how to respond to an aquatic emergency. If a child is missing, check the water first. Seconds count in preventing death or disability. Know how and when to call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number. Enroll in Red Cross water safety, first aid and CPR courses to learn what to do. Have appropriate equipment, such as reaching or throwing equipment, a cell phone, life jackets and a first aid kit.

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